Every day, almost 2,200 American die from cardiovascular disease- that’s an average of one death every 40 seconds.

To inspire Americans to focus on their heart health, the American Heart Association has named February American Heart Month, and Siler & Ingber, LLP could not be more proud to support the cause.

To kick off the month, our family at Siler & Ingber will be participating in National Wear Red Day® starting February 2nd to help save lives by spreading public awareness of cardiovascular disease. By encouraging those around you to make healthier life choices, you can lower the risk of heart disease as much as 80% by just making modest changes to your lifestyle!


Your heart is one of the most vital and magnificent organs in your body…

  • the heart physically works harder than any other muscle in the body
  • on average, your heart pumps 2,000 gallons of blood every day
  • for an individual who is 70-years-old, their heart has already beat more than 2.5 billions times

As amazing as the heart is, it can often be neglected, causing thousands upon thousands of unnecessary deaths around the country every year.


According to the experts, most heart issues stem from atherosclerosis– a process where plaque builds up in the artery walls and blocks blood flow to the heart. Narrow arteries require your heart to work harder to pump blood through the body and allows less blood to flow through causing a number of heart conditions, including:

  • heart failure or congestive heart failure
  • strokes
  • arrhythmia or abnormal heart rhythm
  • heart valve issues
  • blood clots in the arteries

Heart disease can easily worsen when individuals are not aware of the issues. For women, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the country, and some believe a lack of awareness is to blame.


The American Heart Association and Siler & Ingber believe that education and awareness is the first fight against heart disease. Though there are genetic conditions you cannot prevent, there are a number of steps you can take in your life to decrease your chances of developing heart disease:

  • maintain a healthy diet
  • exercise regularly
  • watch your cholesterol levels
  • keep blood pressure in control
  • decrease unnecessary stress
  • do not smoke
  • limit sugary foods to manage blood sugar

In addition to lifestyle changes, visiting your doctor for annual physicals can also help catch heart conditions before they become severe.